Board of Trustees

The Leg Ulcer Charity is run by a board of trustees:

Professor Mark Whiteley

Professor Mark WhiteleyProf Mark Whiteley is an internationally recognised specialist in venous disease and the founder of the Leg Ulcer Charity. Following years of treating venous leg ulcers successfully in patients who had been told that they were incurable and would be in compression bandages for life, Mark tried to spread the word via published research, a published book, lectures and personal correspondence to healthcare professionals involved in ulcer care.

Unable to make any headway with the way ulcers were treated in the UK, and having contacted other leg ulcer charity is that concentrated on dressings, bandaging, nutrition and other patient related factors – but failing to inform patients that they might be curable – Mark decided to set up the leg ulcer charity with the certain knowledge that over 50% of patients suffering from leg ulcers could be cured if only they were investigated and treated using the latest understanding of venous disease.

As such, Mark set up the Leg Ulcer Charity with a view to empowering patients and their carers to insist on the right investigations and treatments, and to fund further research to improve the care of leg ulcers even further.


Mr Barrie Price

Mr Barrie PriceBarrie Price is a well-known Consultant Vascular Surgeon who has for many years specialised in the treatment of venous disorders which includes in its remit, venous ulcers.

As a founding member of the Leg Ulcer Charity and active on the charity’s board, Barrie is passionate about the management of this unfortunately all too common condition. He is particularly concerned that whilst patients with leg ulcers constitute 1% of the UK population, no less that 2% of the NHS’ budget is being spent on this subgroup. This is clearly an uneconomic and some would say farcical situation. Barrie is greatly troubled by the fact that there seems to be so little training in the correct management of these patients who are usually, but not always elderly, with other medical problems. The effect of a leg ulcer not only on the patient but also on the immediate family and friends can be devastating producing long lasting effects in both medical and social terms. There is far too much inconsistency in treatment and a lack of understanding of the pathology of leg ulcers and the problems they cause.

One of aims of the leg ulcer charity are to empower patients and help them to see that they can demand proper assessment by an appropriate specialist and they do not have to put up with poorly conducted conservative treatment for long periods which in the case of many patients is years. Another important aim is to educate those caring for people with these horrible lesions and to guide them by well-focussed research as to the correct treatment regimens for individual patients when they present.

At national level the UK’s performance in the treatment of leg ulcers is nothing short of scandalous and with an ageing population is only likely to get worse if nothing is done. The Leg Ulcer Charity aims to inform patients, educate those who treat them and develop ways of doing things better through solid, well thought out research. These are matters that Barrie Price is happy to be involved with.


Bryn Edwards

Bryn EdwardsBryn Edwards is a chartered accountant and during his career he has worked in most parts of the World.

Since the age of 12 he has had some problems with his legs. At that age he had a long operation on his feet which was followed by 3 months in plaster with an additional 3 years in metal callipers.

In 1992 he had a major car accident, resulting in the loss of sensation in his right leg. As a consequence he has suffered from 6 bouts of cellulitis and constant lymphedema. He has been very fortunate to have had high quality medical treatment which has enabled him to avoid leg ulcers.

However, during the course of receiving treatment he has been in close contact with sufferers of leg ulcers and has become very aware of the considerable pain and discomfort they are forced to endure. He has considerable empathy for the sufferers and would like to support a charity which is dedicated to research to enable a cure to be found for leg ulcers.


Dr Ian Clapp

Dr Ian ClappIan is retired, having worked the major part of his career for Investment Banks in the City. He now spends his time volunteering at a local Epilepsy Trust and visiting older people living alone at home.

As a teenager, he was appalled by the state of the weeping ulcerated legs of both his grandmothers which made it impossible for either of them to walk and caused them great pain.

He feels that anything that can be done to combat such suffering must be worthwhile and his involvement with the charity enables him to give a little bit back to those people who continue to suffer from the same hardship today.


Mr Martin Griffiths

Martin GriffithsMartin Griffiths has an inherited blood condition which ultimately manifests itself as leg ulcers.

Having experienced the lack of understanding of Leg Ulcers within the NHS, he had to seek his own medical advice and support and found the Leg Ulcer Charity. Martin is really keen to add a patients perspective to the work undertaken by the Leg Ulcer Charity and give back as much as he can to educate and inform the medical and patient community respectively.

As a result of the help that the charity provided, Martin was able to get the information he needed and found a private clinic to cure his leg ulcers. He can now continue with his work as an expert witness in the field of mobile communications and as the founder of a forensic software company.